British Audio-Visual Research Network – Virtual Colloquia

The purpose of this series of events is to foster a virtual community of scholars from all disciplines engaged with the study of music and sound in audio-visual media. Our intention is to organise a regular forum for postgraduate researchers and practitioner-researchers to present work in supportive and informal sessions, to take place fortnightly from January 2021.

For this first series of events, we have invited proposals relating to any aspect of music, sound and the moving image. These proposals can take the form of standard 20-minute original conference papers and Q&A, but we have also encouraged the submission of proposals in other formats, including, for example: interviews with industry figures; practice-based sessions; short presentations of research-in-progress and so on.

Research and Impact Objectives:
1. To bring together scholars and practitioners from across and beyond the White Rose Network, engaged with the study of music, sound, and audio-visual media.
2. To encourage interdisciplinary discussions about the study of media music, and to stimulate conversations between academic researchers and industry professionals.
3. To create a broad network of scholars and practitioners engaged with this field, on which future events and projects can build.

The event series will comprise 90-minute sessions on Thursday afternoons every fortnight. Each session will include either two 20-minute conference papers and time for Q&A and general discussion, or a longer 60-minute interview with industry professionals, followed by discussion. We will use the “breakout room” function on Zoom to enable small group conversations following the main content of the sessions, to facilitate virtual networking for PhD students and other researchers.

Awarded

£ 76

Lead Student

Toby Huelin, School of Music, University of Leeds

Other student organisers

Elsa Marsall, University of Sheffield Organisers outside of the White Rose Network: Georgia Brown, Queen Mary University of London; David Cotter, University of  Cambridge; Melissa Morton, University of Edinburgh